Scott Haworth (Attorney)

Scott Haworth (Attorney)

Managing Partner, Haworth Coleman & Gerstman, LLC

New York, United States

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Admitted to the federal and state bars in New York and New Jersey, attorney Scott Haworth Attorney, Managing Partner of the law firm of Haworth, Coleman & Gerstman, LLC, counts among his clients the manufacturers of heavy machinery, medical devices, cosmetics, children’s products, among others; in addition, he represents companies in the packaging, telecom, and construction industries. He defends his clients in matters involving construction, intentional torts, product liability, as well as catastrophic injuries resulting from fire and accidents. Scott Haworth’s representation also extends to environmental and toxic tort claims law concerning such things as lead, asbestos, and mold. Scott Haworth’s clients often are third-party administrators and insurance carriers.

In addition to his efforts on behalf of his clients, Scott Haworth writes frequently on issues of concern to the legal community. He wrote the “Tort Law Update” for the Syracuse Law Review in 2002, 2003, and 2004; “Active Use of the Spoliation Defense,” in For the Defense, the publication of the Defense Research Institute (DRI); and “The Product Liability Preemption Problem: No Clear Directive from the Supreme Court,” in the DRI publication The Voice (since renamed DRI Today). Scott Haworth also has made numerous presentations before legal audiences, addressing such topics as “Product Liability: Great Cases Revisited,” “Defending Medical Device Fire Cases,” and “Labor Law Litigation: Who Pays?”

As a frequent defender of defendants in class action suits, Scott Haworth recently encountered a new phenomenon: lawsuits whose plaintiffs acknowledge that they have suffered no injury, but claim they are entitled to money damages because of some alleged wrongful deed on the part of the manufacturer. Two such class actions involved ingredients in the products of a cosmetics manufacturer. Haworth vigorously defended his client and both cases were dismissed; he later wrote an article, “Stopped Before They Start – Dismissing the No-injury Class Action,” that was published in DRI’s For The Defense. He also developed a presentation, “No Injury, No Problem, the So-called No-injury Class Action,” which was first given before the 2010 meeting of the DRI.